Featured Panels

 

 

Political Science in the Era of Trump

Sponsored by the American Political Science Association

Donald Trump’s surprise victory in the U.S. presidential election, along with the unexpected approval of Brexit and resurgent far right movements in Europe, have brought to the fore pressing questions about the role of political science and how it relates to politics and policymaking. What is the future of academic freedom? What will the relationship between political scientists and government be, and how will that vary around the world? Will there be effects on collaboration among political scientists across the globe?

Should, and how should, these developments affect political science research agendas? How can political scientists best address questions of democracy, populism, and economic distribution? What is the discipline’s role in engaging policymakers and the public on these issues?

This Panel will address these questions, along with what these recent developments mean for political science, both in terms of the unique challenges that they introduce for political science research and their implications for future research agendas.

Date and time Thursday 7 September, 09:00-10:40

Location Eilert Sundts hus, ES AUD 7

Chair Steven Rathgeb Smith, American Political Science Association

Speakers

  • Bo Rothstein, University of Gothenburg
  • Simona Piattoni, Università degli Studi di Trento
  • Steven Rathgeb Smith, American Political Science Association

 

 

Brexit Debate – EPS Symposium

Sponsored by the journal European Political Science

On 23 June 2016, 52% of the British electorate voted in favour of leaving the EU. In March 2017, Prime Minister Theresa May invoked Article 50 of the Treaty of the European Union, which started the formal procedure for withdrawal. What kind of Brexit will we have: hard or soft? How will the relations between Great Britain and the EU look after Britain has left? Who will suffer, and who will benefit from Brexit? Will Brexit be the beginning of the end of the European Union? Among others, these questions will be discussed.

Date and time Thursday 7 September, 11:00-12:40

Location Eilert Sundts hus, ES AUD 7

Chair Daniel Stockemer, Editor of EPS, University of Ottawa

Speakers

  • Sofia Vasilopoulou, University of York
  • Annemarie Dodds, Member of the European Parliament
  • Thomas König, Universität Mannheim
  • Richard Whitman, University of Kent

 

 

The Welfare State in Transition: A Comparative Perspective

Sponsored by the American Political Science Association

The welfare state environment is in the midst of transition, and is changing in ways that have significant implications for the nonprofit and social services sectors. Austerity and welfare retrenchment, increased competition among providers (including with for-profits), and more stringent evaluation and reporting requirements have affected the opportunities and challenges that service providers face. However, these changes, and their implications, differ across the wide variety of welfare states. This panel will address the changes in the welfare state environment and its effects on service providers in comparative perspective, focusing on common trends of austerity and competition while illuminating how different welfare states are dealing with these challenges.

Date and time Friday 8 September, 09:00-10:40

Location Eilert Sundts hus, ES AUD 7

Chair Steven Rathgeb Smith, American Political Science Association

Speakers

  • Per Selle, Universitetet i Bergen
    A Weakening of New Public Management: Will that Increase the Space for Scandinavian Voluntary Sector Service Provision?
  • Katharina Obuch and Danielle Gluns, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster
    For a Better Tomorrow? Social Enterprises in Different Welfare States under Scrutiny
  • Steven Rathgeb Smith, American Political Science Association
    Social Services in an Era of Austerity and Competition

 

The European Research Council @10: What has it done to us?

Sponsored by the European Research Council

The European Research Council (ERC) was established in 2007 with the objectives of encouraging high quality research in Europe through competitive funding, and supporting investigator-driven frontier research across all fields, on the basis of scientific excellence alone. It complements other components of Horizon 2020. This Panel will discuss the following:

  • How has the ERC delivered on its objectives?
  • How has it been received by the various EU bodies, and by national authorities?
  • What has been other effects of the ERC – e.g. concerning inter-European mobility of young researchers, and national research strategies?

The Panel includes researchers who have studied and/or participated in the ERC funding activities, and commentators.

Date and time Friday 8 September, 14:00-15:40

Location Eilert Sundts hus, ES AUD 7

Chair Andreas Føllesdal

Discussants

  • Martin Stokhof, European Research Council
  • Mitchell Young, Charles University in Prague

Speakers

  • Maarja Beerkens, Universiteit Leiden
    The ERC and Academic Career Models in Europe
  • Tim Flink, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin
    The Hopes for the ERC by its Founders
  • Thomas König, Institute for Advanced Studies, Vienna
    The Political Theory of Peer Review for the ERC

 

 

 

Smart Cities: Politics, Policy and Governance

Sponsored by the International Political Science Association

The idea of 'smart cities' has spread globally, though it encompasses a wide range of applications. At its most basic, a smart city initiative is one that employs information and communication technologies to address urban needs. The European Commission defines smart cities as improving 'urban life through more sustainable integrated solutions'.
 
Operationally, smart city solutions have addressed a variety of policy areas, but there is an underlying theme that the use of technology makes possible new forms of governance that are more participatory, open, collaborative, accountable, networked, and efficient. How do we understand the politics, policy, and governance of the use of technology in cities – to what extent are these technologies transforming politics and governance, and what are the consequences for local democracy and effective governing?
 

Date and time Saturday 9 September, 09:00-10:40

Location Eilert Sundts hus, ES AUD 7

Chair Karen Mossberger, Arizona State University

Discussants

  • Karen Mossberger, Arizona State University
  • Pertti Ahonen, University of Helsinki

Speakers

  • Olga Gil, Universidad Autònoma de Madrid – Instituto de Políticas y Bienes Públicos del CSIC
    Citizens' e-Participation & Community Engagement
  • Norbert Kersting, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster
    Crowdsourced monitoring in smart cities in the UK and China
  • Bas Denters and Wouter Jans, Universiteit Twente
    Does the smartness of cities matter?
  • Manuel Pedro Rodrígues Bolívar, Universidad de Granada
    Good governance for creating public value in smart cities
  • Bastian Rottinghaus, Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf
    Measuring online political participation and its consequences for local governments and their citizens

 

 

Academic Freedom, Democracy and Human Rights: Comparative Perspectives

Sponsored by the International Political Science Association

The whirlwind of changes taking place in the international community reminds us of the importance of staying mindful, alert and committed to the fundamental values that the global academic community holds dear. These values include academic freedom and human rights protection, which belong to the large rubric of democracy.

While the election results of France and the Netherlands reassure us of the majority will to curb rising nationalism, we cannot put our anxiety to a rest. The anxiety reflects the global shockwave originating from the Brexit vote and from Donald Trump's electoral victory.

In this shifting milieu we have been witnessing the visible erosion of democratic norms in various parts of the world. We are thus increasingly concerned about the grave consequences of the precarious political upheavals for academia. 

Where are we headed? What can be done? Where to draw the line between academic research and political activism? How to address the controversial topics pertaining to academic freedom (ex. freedom of speech, etc.) and human rights violations (ex. defamation, etc.)? How to negotiate between normative ideals and reality of academic survival?

This Panel is devoted to the disuccsion of academic freedom, and aims to address the following questions: 

  • What are the strategies to better protect academic freedom?
  • How can we contextualise the increasing challenges?
  • How can we promote solidarity across the global academic community?
  • What are the diagnoses as well as prognoses of increasing challenges?

Date and time Saturday 9 September, 11:00-12:40

Location Eilert Sundts hus, ES AUD 7

Chair Mikyoung Kim, Emory University

Speakers

  • Ekmel Gecer, Sakarya University
    Academic Freedom in Turkey: Developing a New Way of Political Rhetoric
  • Zahleh Abdifirouzsalari, Kocaeli University
    Academic Freedoms of Foreign Students in Turkey
  • Mikyoung Kim, Emory University
    Taxonomy of Academics: Power Elites and Politicization of Academic Freedom in Japan
 

"Aristocracies … may preserve themselves longest, but only democracies, which refresh their ruling class, can expand" - Hugh Trevor-Roper


Back to top