Political Research Exchange

Featured Panels

The 'Plan S' Debate: What does Open Access mean for Political Science?
RLI and ECPR Press, Absorbing the Blow: Populist Parties and their Impact on Parties and Party Systems
The Future of Europe: 30 Years After the Fall of the Berlin Wall. A Debate on the Role of East European Countries in the EU – then, now, and in the future

Political Research ExchangeThe 'Plan S' Debate: What does Open Access mean for Political Science?

Sponsored by the journal Political Research Exchange (PRX)

Recent moves by funding bodies towards mandating Open Access to research, exemplified by 'Plan S', are making it ever more essential for scholars in the political sciences to engage with, and understand, the diversity of publishing options available to them. 

Alongside potential benefits of increased visibility and availability, mandatory OA has been criticised for potential negative impacts it may have on scholarly societies, academic freedom, and equality and diversity, especially for independent scholars and researchers in the Global South. This panel brings together a variety of perspectives in a roundtable format, to encourage open discussion and debate. 

Date and time Thursday 5 September, 11:00–12:40

Location Building D (Law Faculty), Lecture Hall 2

Chair Caroline Sutton Director of Editorial Development at Taylor & Francis

Speakers

  • Martin Bull University of Salford, outgoing ECPR Director
  • Claire Dunlop University of Exeter, and UK Political Studies Association Trustee
  • Peter Kennealy Information Specialist, Political and Social Sciences, European University Institute Library
  • Aneta Pazik Coordinator for Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences, National Science Centre

ECPR Press and RLIAbsorbing the Blow: Populist Parties and their Impact on Parties and Party Systems

Sponsored by Rowman & Littlefield International and ECPR Press

Absorbing the Blow: Populist Parties and their Impact on Parties and Party Systems Zaslove and WolinetzIt is now a cliché to say that populist parties are successful. However, it also a truism. Populist parties are present in most party systems across Europe. Their success begs the question: What has the effect of populist parties been on party systems? Have party systems been forced to react to their presence? For example, populist parties may alter the manner in which non-populist parties compete. Or the presence of populist parties may lead to a more fragmented or polarised party system. These are some of the questions addressed in the multi-authored volume Absorbing the Blow.

More specifically, this edited collection examines the effect of populist parties on eleven European party systems. The results are mixed. The book finds that impact often depends on the influence that populist parties have had on mainstream political parties – those that hitherto dominated party competition. In some instances, populist parties reinforce existing patterns of competition and government formation. Party systems that were bipolar continue to be bipolar. In others change occurs, either because populist parties make it difficult for mainstream parties to form coalitions that were hitherto possible, or because their presence allows mainstream parties to form coalitions that were not previously conceivable. This collection seeks to analyse the way in which mainstream parties absorb the blow of populist party activity, and concludes that populist parties are one of several factors contributing to changes in party systems.

Using this edited collection as a starting point, first, the Panel will present the book’s framework for assessing the impact of populist parties on party systems and party system change. Second, the Panel will allow several of the book's contributors to reflect and update on the conclusions from their chapters, and from the book. In sum, the Panel will assess the influence that populist parties have had on contemporary European party systems.  

Date and time Friday 6 September, 09:00–10:40

Location Building D (Law Faculty), Lecture Hall 2

Chair Dhara Snowden Rowman & Littlefield International

Co-Chair Andrej Zaslove Radboud Universiteit Nijmegen

Discussant Stijn van Kessel Queen Mary, University of London

Speakers

  • Gilles Ivaldi Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique
  • Reinhard Heinisch Universität Salzburg
  • Simona Guerra University of Leicester
  • Fernando Casal Bértoa University of Nottingham

European Political Science (Palgrave)The Future of Europe 30 Years After the Fall of the Berlin Wall:
EPS Debate on the Role of East European Countries in the EU – then, now, and in the future

Sponsored by the journal European Political Science

Given recent developments in East and Western Europe, the European Parliament election this spring, and the 30-year anniversary of the fall of the communist regime, it is imperative we look at the effect that East European member states have had, and continue to have, on the European Union.

As political developments in certain East European countries resonate with a number of rightwing political parties in Western Europe, the connection between the 'state' of illiberalism, the refugee crisis, and other pressing political issues, such as Brexit, raise questions about the future of Europe.

In this Panel, four renowned scholars whose research touches upon various related topics will discuss the role of East European countries in the EU. We will discuss voting behaviour, EU enlargement, and the impact of European integration on national politics, in terms of public attitudes and party politics, including the emergence and development of Eurosceptic discourses.

Date and time Friday 6 September, 11:00–12:40

Location Building D (Law Faculty), Lecture Hall 2

Chair and Discussant Ekaterina Rashkova University of Utrecht

Speakers

  • Gabor Toka Central European University
  • Aleks Szczerbiak University of Sussex
  • Vit Hlousek Masaryk University
 

"Those who would give up essential Liberty, to purchase a little temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety." - Benjamin Franklin


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