A Closely Coupled Tango? Interactions between Electoral and Protest Politics

Participation
 
Parties and elections
 

Workshop Director
Ondřej Císař
Charles University in Prague
Workshop Co-Director
Swen Hutter
European University Institute

Abstract
The proposed workshop focuses on one of the most debated theoretical and empirical problems of social movement and collective action research. Social movement studies have tended to declare social movements the defining feature of established post-1968 democracies and generally prioritized the protest arena of action. However, there have been important recent contributions pointing out the need to focus on the electoral arena, political parties, and their interactions with social movements and protest politics. In fact, this type of inter-arena interaction constitutes one of the most important challenges of social movement research. At present, their interaction remains undertheorized and understudied. Moreover, by focusing on these two particular arenas, the papers assembled in the workshop will be able to address more general issues related to interactions of social fields in modern societies. Also, it will hopefully stimulate conversations across various research areas by bringing together scholars working on social movements, political parties and their networks, as well as on political participation and representation more generally. Given that European societies are currently facing multiple challenges, such as the recent economic recession in some parts of the continent, the rise in political populism, and xenophobic mobilization against diverse representatives of the supposed European “other”, this type of research focused not only on protest, but also its electoral consequences is about to become even more important. This is currently reinforced by the European “migrant crisis” which holds a clear potential to politically reconfigure not only the European political arena, but also national politics in many member states. In this respect, the workshop focuses on a problem of high real-world relevance.
Time
26/04/2017 09:00
Location
Building: Business School South Room: Room A26
Export Panel to Calendar

Paper List


Title 
 
 
Connecting Movements and Parties: The Case of the Indignados and Podemos View Paper Details
Democratic Ideals and Levels of Political Participation: The Role of Political and Social Conceptualizations of Democracy View Paper Details
Efficacy, Blame Attribution, and Protest Scope: Findings from a Survey Experiment in South Africa View Paper Details
Emergent Forms of Political Equality: The Role of Contentious Politics in Levelling the Playing Field of Political Engagement View Paper Details
Exploring the Electoral Imprint of the 2014 Bosnian Protests: Exit, Voice, Loyalty, or None of the Above? View Paper Details
German and Greek Citizens Talking Politics: The Eurocrisis and Political Participation View Paper Details
How Citizens talk about Political Engagement: A Comparison across Regimes with Different Party-Movement Relations View Paper Details
How do People Influence Politics? Explaining Cross-National Variation in the Relationship between Engagement in Party and Movement Politics View Paper Details
Movement Parties against Austerity: the case of Syriza View Paper Details
Movement Parties and Party Movements: Enquiry into the Far Right View Paper Details
Parties in the Streets of Europe: A Comparative Assessment View Paper Details
Parties in the Streets: Conservative Movement Politics in Poland and Hungary View Paper Details
Politics of Protest in Poland View Paper Details
Protests, Signalling and Coalitions: Opposition-Movement Interactions in Argentina’s Anti-Government Protests (2012-2013) View Paper Details
Re-Shaping the Anti-Austerity Political Field of Contention: Comparing the Cycles of Protest in Portugal and Spain View Paper Details
The Policy Consequences of Alternative Participation: Civil Society Events and Public Expenditure View Paper Details
The Role of Parties in the Austrian Protest Arena, 1998–2016 View Paper Details
Two Worlds of Dissatisfaction? Electoral Punishment and Protest Politics Compared View Paper Details
Share this page
 

"Those who would give up essential Liberty, to purchase a little temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety." - Benjamin Franklin


Back to top