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Institutionalisation of Political Parties: Comparative Cases. Edited by Robert Harmel and Lars G. Svasand

Functional Logics of Political Violence

Conflict
 
Contentious Politics
 
Political Violence
 
Terrorism
 
Decision Making
 
Panel Number
P176
Panel Chair
Michael Fürstenberg
Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology
Panel Co-Chair
Sebastian Lange
Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin
Panel Discussant
Miriam M. Müller-Rensch
University of Applied Sciences Erfurt

Time
23/08/2018 11:00 - 12:40
Location
Building: VMP 9 Floor: 2 Room: 29
Abstract
Political violence is often seen as instrumental in nature but it remains unclear how certain strategies of political violence are connected to the perpetrators’ goals. “Terrorism”, for example, has been explained as violent “propaganda of the deed”, a way of provoking the state into a delegitimizing overreaction, costly signaling, or a mere tactic to attain process objectives. This Panel explores the functional logic of diverse manifestations of political violence, their tactical or strategic role, as well as how they can be connected conceptually. It is open to approaches from different theoretical perspectives and focusing on various forms of violent strategies.

Paper List


Title Details
Political Regimes and the Determinants of Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism View Paper Details
Studying Political Violence Through Counter Cases: Why Has There Been So Little Political Violence in Post-War Finland? View Paper Details
The Functions and Dysfunctions of Political Violence: Disaggregating the Campaign of the Provisional IRA View Paper Details
Why Men Terrorize. Explanations for Non-Warring Political Violence View Paper Details
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