ECPR

Install the app

Install this application on your home screen for quick and easy access when you’re on the go.

Just tap Share then “Add to Home Screen”



Strategies of Secession and Counter-Secession

Political Mobilisation and Institutional Development in the Aftermath of Civil War

Comparative Politics
 
Conflict Resolution
 
Democratisation
 
Party Systems
 
Peace
 
Panel Number
P272
Panel Chair
Gyda Sindre
University of York
Panel Discussant
John Ishiyama
University of North Texas

Time
07/09/2019 09:00 - 10:40
Location
Building: (Building A) Faculty of Law, Administration & Economics Floor: 2nd floor Room: 215
Abstract
In the last few decades, the political inclusion of rebel groups into competitive electoral politics has become the norm in contemporary peacebuilding. In fact, since the end of the Cold War, rebel group inclusion into formal politics following the end of civil war, correlates positively with peace settlement durability and long-term political stability. At the same time, former rebel groups’ chances of survival as parties and winning elections is determined both by the specific peacebuilding mechanisms put in place and by institutional context within which they mobilize. How do policies interact with the parties’ desire to seek representation? How does the inclusion of former rebel groups into politics impact on party system development? When and to what extent do war-related factors trump the effects of institutional design? Overall, the papers in this panel address the question of how political mobilization, peacebuilding policies, and institutional development interact to shape specific outcomes concerning stability and democracy in civil war affected countries.

Paper List


Title Details
Consociational Democracy after Civil Wars: Whose Power? View Paper Details
From Peace to Polarisation? The Fate of Power Sharing in Northern Ireland View Paper Details
Post-Rebel Parties and Party System Formation View Paper Details
The Effects of Asymmetrical Demobilisation on Post-Conflict Violence: Evidence from Guatemala and Northern Ireland View Paper Details
Share this page