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Institutionalisation of Political Parties: Comparative Cases. Edited by Robert Harmel and Lars G. Svasand

The Impact of Internationalisation and Norm Transfer on Minority Protection Policies

Presenter
Katharina Crepaz
Max Planck Institute for Social Law and Social Policy & TU Munich
Authors
Katharina Crepaz
Max Planck Institute for Social Law and Social Policy & TU Munich

Abstract
This paper argues that the internationalization of minority issues, whether it happens in the EU or through other means and organizations, is an important factor in making steps towards empowerment. If a nation state is reluctant to adhere to protection norms, the internationalization of the problem can lead to wider recognition, which could then generate more pressure on domestic actors. Internationalization can also lead to shaming processes, if the state is made aware of its deviant behavior from the norm entrepreneur group it aims to belong to.
By looking at other variables that have an impact on minority protection being implemented (such as the presence of conditionality, the degree of conflict of international norms with state preferences, the presence of a kin-state in the EU and the strength of civil society), I will try to show that internationalization can be a crucial factor in norm adoption. Four countries will serve as case studies and examples for different outcomes and modes of norm transfer: Italy, France, Croatia, and Poland.
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