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Who deserves what and why? The driving forces behind public opinion towards immigrants’ integration

Comparative Politics
Democracy
Migration
Immigration
Public Opinion
Empirical
P470
Jerome Gonnot
European University Institute
Lenka Drazanova
European University Institute
Lenka Drazanova
European University Institute
Lenka Drazanova
European University Institute
Jerome Gonnot
European University Institute
Adrienn Gyory
Central European University
Inge Hendriks
Radboud Universiteit Nijmegen
Philipp Lutz
University of Geneva

Tuesday 13:00 - 14:45 (31/08/2021)


Abstract

As emphasized by the European Commission’s new Action Plan on Integration and Inclusion (2021-2027), the integration of immigrants is high on the political agenda of many destination countries and often a main concern of their native population. Against this background and given the timeliness of the topic, this panel proposes to examine public attitudes to immigrant´s economic, social, and political integration. The participation and socio-economic inclusion of people with a migrant background into the economy and other areas of society is indeed a particularly relevant topic, not least because of the large numbers of immigrants that have entered Europe during the past decade and the recent global pandemic, which has plunged the world into the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression. Prevailing attitudes in destination societies regarding immigrants’ access to jobs and social benefits have been the subject of intense debates in the scientific literature. Yet, the unprecedented employment losses resulting from the COVID pandemic call for further investigations of natives’ income-based competition with immigrants on the labor market. Likewise, as the Coronavirus destroys jobs and worsens inequality, more and more people rely on welfare protection, which will put to the test existing theories about native workers’ attitudes towards immigrants’ access to redistribution. Surprisingly, less is known about public attitudes to immigrants’ access to citizenship and voting rights, which represent an area of weakness of current integration policies in Western countries, where with very few exceptions such as New-Zealand, Portugal, and the UK, foreign residents are mostly excluded from national suffrage. The study of attitudes towards political integration remains however an important research question given the potential consequences of granting political representation to immigrants in increasingly diverse host societies. This panel contributes to our understanding of the driving forces behind public opinion towards immigrants’ integration, including comparative works on the similarities and discrepancies in public attitudes between countries and across various integration areas.

Title Details
Negative Outgroup Attitudes and Opposition to Democratic Norms View Paper Details
Do immigrants at bay keep the xenophobes away? Immigrant rights and public opposition to immigration View Paper Details
Talking Immigration – Changing attitudes to immigrants’ access to welfare benefits and services View Paper Details
Drivers of attitudes to immigration: Evidence from a cross-disciplinary meta-analysis View Paper Details
Accepting Refugees and Immigrants into the Country while Rejecting Them from the Neighbourhood? A Study on the Determinants of NIMBY Opposition View Paper Details