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Back to Panel Details
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Mistakes and Fiascos in Foreign Policy

European Union
Foreign Policy
Analytic
P204
Kai Oppermann
University of Sussex
Alexander Spencer
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München – LMU

Friday 09:00 - 10:40 (05/09/2014)

Building: Boyd Orr Floor: 2 Room: LT 2

Abstract

The panel is intended to enable an original and innovative exchange of ideas on the comparative study of foreign policy ‘fiascos’. The panel is open to perspectives which consider foreign policy mistakes to be objectively measurable as well as perspectives which focus on the social construction of mistakes. It is interested in the question of what makes a foreign policy ‘fiasco’, be it objective criteria or intersubjective attribution. It will seek to further theorizing on what characterizes a mistake and which actors (e.g. political elites, the media etc.) take an active part in mistake construction; how domestic and international audiences interrelate in this process; and what conditions are conducive to making mistakes or to constructing political decisions as ‘mistakes’. Furthermore, the panel compares and seeks out patterns of mistakes and their construction across countries and policy areas. It hopes to shed new light on cases that have traditionally been discussed as foreign policy ‘fiascos’ and extend the scope of cases that can usefully be analysed as instances of mistakes or the process of their construction.

Title Details
Moral Dissonance, Group Mistakes, and the Age of Risk View Paper Details
Foreign Policy Mistakes and Foreign Policy Vacuums: New Labour and the EU View Paper Details
Political Survival and Cumulative Fiascos: Britain, Zionism and the Palestine Mandate View Paper Details
Telling Stories of Failure: Narrative Constructions of Foreign Policy Fiascos View Paper Details