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From a Neo-Liberal to Non-Liberal Context: Social Movements in (and Of) the Dark Times?

Europe (Central and Eastern)
Comparative Politics
Political Parties
Social Movements
Mobilisation
Capitalism
P169
Ondřej Císař
Charles University
Jiří Navrátil
Masaryk University

Building: VMP 5, Floor: 2, Room: 2091

Friday 09:00 - 10:40 (24/08/2018)


Abstract

Recent political developments in liberal democracies suggest that both political conflicts and actors are undergoing significant transformations. First, old types of societal cleavages are being reinforced (center/periphery, socio-economic) and merge with new socio-cultural trends (new nationalism, de-Europeanization, new conservatism). Second, new actors enter the arenas of both protest and electoral politics; new forms of populism arise, new repertoire is being employed. Third, political opportunities have been transformed for the existing forms of social and political activism. In our panel, we aim at an analysis of social movement groups driving and/or facing the rise of populist right in Eastern Europe. In 2010, Fidesz won the majority of seats in the parliamentary elections in Hungary, and also Jobbik succeeded. We have witnessed a nearly regime change, a move towards self-proclaimed illiberal democracy, since then. A very similar development defined Polish politics since 2015. In both countries a series of protests accompanied these developments. In the Czech Republic, political populism has recently taken a managerial/anti-political form. Although semantically different, all these parties run on the platform, which challenges political pluralism and liberal tolerance of the past. Similar trends can be observed in other countries too. What are the consequences for social movement groups? Can we observe any transformations in the way they act publicly and cooperate with their partners? Are they declining, adjusting their agenda and strategies, or calling to arms? Are they innovating their strategies? We aim at identifying the dynamics of these aspects of political activism in the current period.

Title Details
(Il)liberalism and Populism in the Visegrád Four: Toward a Discourse and Hegemony Analysis View Paper Details
Lo and Behold: Jobbik and the Crafting of a New Hungarian Far-Right View Paper Details
Working in the Gaps Left Behind: Radical Right Movement Parties in a Consolidating Party System View Paper Details
Different Worlds of Contention? Left and Right Protest Across Europe View Paper Details
Explaining Support for Right-Wing Populist Parties in Central and Eastern Europe View Paper Details