ECPR

Install the app

Install this application on your home screen for quick and easy access when you’re on the go.

Just tap Share then “Add to Home Screen”

ECPR

Install the app

Install this application on your home screen for quick and easy access when you’re on the go.

Just tap Share then “Add to Home Screen”

Mediating Complex Diversity: New Patterns of Solidarity and Cleavages among EU and non-EU migrants in Denmark and Germany

Civil Society
Contentious Politics
European Union
Migration
Social Capital
Immigration
Jurisprudence
Deniz Duru
University of Copenhagen
Deniz Duru
University of Copenhagen
Hans-Jörg Trenz
Scuola Normale Superiore
Ulrike Zschache
University of Siegen

Abstract

The question of how to establish a common European asylum system that is based on the principle of solidarity is currently one of the most pressing challenges to European cohesion. On the one hand, solidarity and a fair distribution of refugees have increasingly been promoted by the European Commission, Council and Parliament and are explicitly enshrined in the EU Treaties. On the other hand, the effective enforcement of these principles has so far been impeded by the refusal of various member states to implement a system of intra-European burden-sharing and the unwillingness to reform the Dublin system. The paper investigates two of the most attractive target countries, Germany and Denmark. Both countries have established a universal welfare system, which is seen under strain in confronting the flux of incoming refugees. At the same time, though, remarkable civic refugee help initiatives and a growing welcome culture have emerged among parts of society. We explore whether and to what extent the recent migration movements have led to restrictions in welfare services. Secondly, we analyse the legal pillars of a solidarity-based European asylum system. Thirdly, we look at the societal responses and bottom-up initiatives in solidarity with refugees. We investigate cleavages and patterns of solidarity acts that aim to help the newcomers in their settlement to Denmark and Germany.