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Digital Media, Machine Learning, and Corruption: How the Newest Technological Development Facilitate and Curb Corruption Practices Across the World

Participation
Institutions
VIRTUAL008
Alice Mattoni
Università di Bologna
Roxana Bratu
University of Sussex

Tuesday 10:30 - 12:30 (25/05/2021)

Wednesday 10:30 - 12:30 (26/05/2021)

Thursday 10:30 - 12:30 (27/05/2021)

Friday 10:30 - 12:30 (28/05/2021)

Monday 10:30 - 12:30 (24/05/2021)


Abstract

This workshop aims at addressing a relevant and yet so far neglected aspect of corruption: how the newest technological developments might function both as a facilitator of corruption practices and, at the same time, might instead help to counter them. Investigations on how digital media can support corruption and related illegal activities have increased in the past years and continue to expand. Recent criminological research (Shelley 2014) has shown that transnational crime (e.g. trafficking in persons, arms, migrant smuggling, terrorism) heavily relies on the uses of digital media and technology more widely to facilitate its trade (Pyrooz et al 2015); money laundering linked to corrupt transactions has become easier due to technological advancements, as well as the use of cryptocurrencies which allows of pseudo-anonymous transactions (Reynolds and Irwin 2017). At the same time, research on strategies to counter corruption in the public sector argues that social media and mobile phones are relevant to empower citizens' monitoring capacity (Inuwa et al. 2019). Similarly, digital media platforms might enhance crowdsourcing and whistleblowing activities from the grassroots to promote transparency (Kossow 2020). With the due attention, machine learning applications might enable governmental and civil society actors to see corruption at work when it otherwise remains invisible, but even to predict the development of future corrupt behaviors (Arvik 2019). Through this workshop, we aim to bring together scholars with different disciplinary backgrounds to develop a nuanced understanding of how digital media, machine learning, and other types of recent technological developments can simultaneously support anti-corruption efforts and corruption practices. We invite papers linked (but not limited) to one or more of the following questions: Which are the methodological challenges of studying digital media, machine learning, and other types of recent technological developments in the framework of corruption and anti-corruption? What are the challenges anti-corruption activists face when developing their own digital media platforms, machine learning algorithms, and other technological supports to counter corruption? Which types of new challenges civil society actors, governmental agencies, and international organizations face due to the emergent forms of technologically mediated corruption? Which are the technological imaginaries that anti-corruption activists, governmental agencies, and international organizations develop about digital media, machine learning, and other types of recent technological developments? How do the most recent technological developments change their role according to the specific anti-corruption and/or corruption country context in which they are employed? How the use of digital media, machine learning, and other types of recent technological developments can change patterns of corruption and/or anti-corruption efforts? How can digital media employment, machine learning, and other types of recent technological developments in the framework of anti-corruption actions foster reactions in the world of corruption, bringing new developments in corruption practices? We welcome papers that employ qualitative, quantitative, or mixed-methods research designs. Papers should be based on empirical research, but we are also open to submissions based on solid theoretical and methodological reflections on the overall workshop’s topic as well as policy-based contributions.

Title Details
Automating Anticorruption? Algorithmic Opacity as a Challenge for a Public Ethics of Office Accountability View Paper Details
Exploring the Role of Technology in Fighting Corruption in the Indian Healthcare Sector View Paper Details
Overcoming the Limited Access Order: A Comparative Analysis of E-Petition Platforms in Estonia and Ukraine View Paper Details
The Discussion Dynamics About Corruption and Anti-Corruption on Facebook: the Case of Italy View Paper Details
Ethical Risks of Artificial Intelligence in the Digital Media, Corruption and Financial Crime Nexus View Paper Details
Analog VS Digital: Comparing Two Italian Anticorruption Campains View Paper Details
Same Same But Different: Using Digital Platforms for Accountability in Education Sector When Corruption Is An Exception or A Norm View Paper Details
Bots Against Corruption: Exploring Benefits and Limitations of AI-Based Anti-Corruption Technology View Paper Details
Technology as a Double-Edged Sword: Corruption and Anti-Corruption Developments in Brazil View Paper Details
Reflecting on the Methodological Challenges to Understanding the Impact of New Technology on Anti-Corruption Efforts View Paper Details