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The Political Mobilisation of Immigrant-Origin Minorities

Migration
Political Participation
Political Parties
Electoral Behaviour
Political Engagement
P431
Santiago Pérez-Nievas
Universidad Autònoma de Madrid – Instituto de Políticas y Bienes Públicos del CSIC
Daniela Vintila
Université de Liège
Angeliki Konstantinidou
Sciences Po Paris

Friday 09:00 - 10:45 (03/09/2021)


Abstract

In a context of declining turnout in many advanced democracies, the question of when, how and why immigrant-origin minorities mobilise politically in their residence and origin countries has gained significant relevance in contemporary migration studies and political participation research. Across several home and host countries in Europe and beyond, migrants and their offspring represent an emerging political force, due to diversified mobility patterns, naturalization processes and enfranchisement policies. Yet, existing evidence oftentimes points towards different institutional rules and political factors that still hinder migrants’ political activism, while also showing that their political participation patterns may vary widely across countries or between groups. A migration background also seems to have certain effect on the selection of modes of engagement, vote choice or political preferences, with migrants’ political behaviour deviating from that of non-migrants in certain contexts. Finally, the effects of mobility on the strategies developed by parties or home/host country authorities towards migrant populations are still to be addressed. The papers included in this panel explore these questions of migrants’ political mobilisation in origin and destination countries.

Title Details
The role of religious engagement in mobilizing immigrant political participation in the case of Sweden View Paper Details
External voting, diaspora party systems & (il)liberal remittances: A comparative analysis of Central European post-accession elections View Paper Details
Do parties “act” as they “talk” about immigrants’ incorporation? View Paper Details
Hybrid and Authoritarian Imprints on Migrant Voting View Paper Details
Democratizing Sending Countries? Political Regime, International Migration, and Political Participation View Paper Details