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The Sociology of Political Careers: The Revolving Door of Professionals and Politicians

Europe (Central and Eastern)
Elites
Executives
Parliaments
Political Sociology
Candidate
P436
Tomas Turner-Zwinkels
University of Basel
Hélène Michel
Institut d'Études Politiques de Strasbourg
Jennifer vanHeerde-Hudson
University College London

Building: Faculty of Arts, Floor: 3, Room: FA313

Friday 09:00 - 10:40 (09/09/2016)


Abstract

This panels brings together scholars interested in the careers of politicians and particularly those interested in interplay between the political and professional career of politicians. Indeed, many political actors nowadays move freely between the different (political, public and private sector) domains of society. They key aim of the panel is to explore the applicability of ideas developed by labor market sociologists to the study this phenomenon. (Political) positions are filled when available and qualified candidates are matched with available and desirable jobs. The contacts, skills, knowledge and resources build up in the political domain are often however also valuable in the professional domain and vice-versa. Career transitions thus require decisions from both organizations and candidates: parties, organizations and companies must decide what candidates they consider (most) valuable, candidates must decide what positions to pursue. The combined effect of these decisions results in the career patterns we observe among political actors. In this panel we aim to explore the extent to which this such a perspective on careers could help (or harm) political scientists that are trying to understand political career dynamics. We encourage submissions from all methodological approaches and disciplines but particularly encourage submission to the panel by those interested in the revolving door phenomenon and other similar substantive topics in which the sequencing, frequency, occurrence of timing of (political) career transitions has become a central analytical concept.

Title Details
Patterned and Predictable?: Parliamentary Careers in the UK House of Commons, 1979-2010 View Paper Details
Keep Options Open: How Non-Political Career Alternatives Impact the Career Decisions of Politicians View Paper Details
Revolving Doors for Better Public Management? View Paper Details
What happens after? An analysis of post-parliamentary private sector career positions in Germany and the Netherlands View Paper Details