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Institutional Integrity and Corruption

Institutions
Political Theory
Corruption
Normative Theory
P219
Nikolas Kirby
University of Oxford
Petr Urban
Czech Academy of Sciences - Institute of Philosophy

Building: VMP 5, Floor: 2, Room: 2091

Thursday 11:00 - 12:40 (23/08/2018)


Abstract

Whilst recent debates about the nature of individual integrity and corruption have begun to mature, new debates are emerging about the possibility, definitions and implications of institutional integrity and corruption. What does it mean, if anything, for an institution to have integrity or be corrupt? Are they exact antonyms, or does the absence of corruption not entail the presence of integrity? Are these notions reducible to the integrity or corruption of individuals, or are they conceptually distinct? How important is such integrity or corruption to the trustworthiness and legitimacy of such institutions? Do these notions best fit within a deontological, consequentialist or virtue logic? To what extent do they depend upon a clear idea of institutional purpose, and if so how can we determine that? Do such ideas apply seamlessly to both public and private institutions? Finally, and perhaps most importantly, how can such notions be operationalised for use by practitioners in the context of public policy? Within this panel, we welcome submissions on the conceptual and normative issues, as well as any critical engagement with empirical material and case studies.

Title Details
An Institutional Conception of Public Integrity View Paper Details
The Internal Enemy of Public Institutions View Paper Details
The Opposite of Political Corruption: A Publicity-Based Account View Paper Details
Dysfunctional Epistemic Institutions as a Form of Corruption? View Paper Details