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Contemporary Challenges to European Security Architecture and Baltic States

Europe (Central and Eastern)
European Politics
NATO
Security
Ieva Karpaviciute
Vytautas Magnus University/ General Jonas Žemaitis Military Academy of Lithuania
Ieva Karpaviciute
Vytautas Magnus University/ General Jonas Žemaitis Military Academy of Lithuania

Abstract

The paper depicts how the European Security Architecture is managing to adapt to contemporary security challenges. European security architecture, which is based on principles and norms enshrined in the Helsinki Final Act, the Paris Charter, and based on the UN Charter is evidently crumbling. This process reflects the changes in regional security order, its major shifts, and in some cases, intentional attempts to portray it as an exceptionally weak system. Evidently, arms control treaties that used to stabilize military dynamics, and bring trust, transparency, and predictability are being undermined. Russia’s non-implementation of the CFE Treaty obligations and selective implementation of the Vienna Document and the Open Skies Treaty has resulted in the weakening of the arms control and transparency framework. In addition to conventional arms control, the regional security architecture is affected by the demise of the INF treaty, discussions on the extension of New START and strategic security dialogue between Russia and the USA contribute to European security and stability. The paper will discuss the Baltic States' interests and roles in contemporary European Security Architecture and their adaptation to a changing environment. The paper will depict the European Security Architecture as perceived by the Baltic States, highlighting the major and the most significant elements as underlined by the Baltics.