ECPR

Install the app

Install this application on your home screen for quick and easy access when you’re on the go.

Just tap Share then “Add to Home Screen”



Gendering the European Parliament

The 'Reggio Model' and the Political Choices of the 'Ndrangheta: A Case Study from the South of Italy on Politics of the Mafia and Mafia in Politics

Europe (Central and Eastern)
 
Governance
 
Organised Crime
 
Presenter
Anna Sergi
University of Essex
Authors
Anna Sergi
University of Essex

Abstract
Academic attention to the phenomenon of the Calabrian ‘Ndrangheta, the most powerful amongst the Italian Mafias, has recently attempted to analyse the criminal organisation either from the point of view of the criminal activities pursued or from the point of view of the apparent colonisation or transplantation of the organisation's structures elsewhere around the world. Mainstream research on the subject, especially outside Italy, seems to have neglected the local dimension of this powerful mafia that in Calabria still has its roots, its traditions and most of all its political power.
This paper aims at proposing a new angle on the study of the 'Ndrangheta by attempting an analysis the 'politics' of the clans in the organisation and at the same time by confronting it to the behaviours of politicians in Calabria whose interests eventually converge with the ones of the mafia families mostly because of overlapping personalities, belonging both to the legal and the illegal world. In order to proceed with such analysis the paper will discuss the networks of power in Calabria: mafia ties, political patronage, masonry relations and all other relevant actors and it will specifically focus on the city of Reggio Calabria whose recent historical events - the dissolution of the town council for mafia infiltration and the failure of the so called 'Reggio Model' for the economics of the city - impose a very stringent reflection on the way politics and organised crime share the same space in Calabria and possibly beyond and how can this be stopped through National and European interventions.
Share this page